Driving emergencies

Learn how you can help your drivers deal with emergencies while they are out on the road.

Fleet training programs from a legal perspective

The creation and implementation of a fleet training program is intended to reduce the number of accidents involving vehicles within your fleet

Why you should be a defensive driver

According to the National Safety Council’s Injury Facts, someone is injured on the road every 18 seconds – over 2 million of those are disabling injuries and from those disabling injuries.

Flashing yellow

A flashing yellow light means you may proceed with caution. Most often it is used at dangerous intersections, congested locations, pedestrian crossings, or in construction zones.

Adjust to weather and road conditions

As part of your defensive driving program, you must know how to adjust to weather and road conditions.

Carrying a load

When it comes to defensive driving, knowing how to properly secure a load, especially if it is secured outside of the vehicle, can make all the difference in your getting to your destination safely.

Fatigue can be fatal

Defensive driving requires you to know and understand the dangers of driving while overly tired or fatigued.

Don't drink or take drugs and drive

Defensive driving programs should always stress the dangers associated with drugs and alcohol.

Be extra careful at night

Driving at night adds extra hazards and is often more stressful. To reduce the risk of having an accident when driving after dark, be sure to take these precautions.

Keep alert and be prepared

A few tips on how you can stay alert and be prepared for changing conditions.